I Inspire Youth With My Story – Please don’t do it!

 

How old do our kids have to be before we feel they can actually start learning and understanding things. Well, it is probably earlier than you think.

I had a chance to tell my story to this group of elementary kids. I kept telling my niece that they wouldn’t understand my life of drugs, prison and homelessness. I didn’t even want to go because the oldest was probably about 7 years old. In fact, there were even kids only 4 or 5 at this school. But my niece, a B.O.S.S. graduate and trainer assured me they would understand.

So, I said I would go against my better judgement. Imagine my surprise when I started talking about being homeless, living under a tree in Pontiac Michigan and only having a few old-raggedy pieces of clothes to my name -the hurt and pain they displayed. I could see and feel their sadness.

They understood the power drugs could have over one’s life and how my testimony reinforced their determination never to use drugs.

And when I shared about my niece finding me after 65 years and flying me to Vegas where I now live. And how I am now a Microsoft Innovative Educator, I teach computers to the homeless, write music, the Chief Technology Office for Tech Queen Systems, personally met the governor, police chief, the Under sheriff and many other accomplishments. They began to clap and cheer with authentic enthusiasm.

So our kids are aware; they can learn if we teach them. We have to believe that if we invest our time and resources into our next generation, out contributions will have a powerful and positive affect on our K-12 students.

My message of “Please don’t do it” inspires youths to stay away from the kind of life that will gradually result in their failure. Everybody wants to be a winner. Let’s urge them to go to school, get an education, get a good job or own their own business, enjoy a family, stay away from drugs and don’t forget where they came from. Remember, to give back to the very community and people that helped them will carry on for generation after generation. “Each One Teach One!”